Manhattan, NY – Battle over Addition to Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue Continues

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    Photo Credit: The Jewish Week

    Manhattan, NY – On the eve of a season focused on aspiring to spiritual heights, Congregation Shearith Israel on West 70th Street is celebrating a more physical ascension. The historic congregation, founded in 1654 by Sephardic Jews and commonly known as the Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue, was granted permission on Aug. 26 from the city’s Board of Standard and Appeals to build a controversial nine-story community house adjacent to its landmarked synagogue.

    The mixed-use tower will replace the current community house, a shabby building connected to the synagogue. The two cellar levels and first four floors will allow for the expansion of the smaller synagogue, as well as state-of-the-art meat and dairy kitchens, a 350-person multifunction banquet room, rabbinical and administrative offices, and 12 classrooms. It will also provide a direct, enlarged entrance to the synagogue, which will be wheelchair accessible.

    Funding for the community house will be offset by the conversion of the top four-and-a-half floors into luxury condos and a penthouse.

    The victory is temporary, as it has instigated yet another legal round in Shearith Israel’s divisive, decades-long battle with preservation groups and outraged neighbors, most notable among them the late ABC News anchor and across-the-street neighbor Peter Jennings.

    Opponents of Shearith Israel’s proposed tower call the BSA’s decision “irresponsible,” saying that the ruling is a precedent-setter, paving the way for a host of other religious institutions and nonprofits to seek variances in order to maximize their profits when selling air rights to developers.

    Meanwhile, Shearith Israel’s trustees say they are “pleased” with the BSA approval and “look forward to proceeding with the project.”
    “There are real benefits here, providing for better circulation outside the sanctuary,” says Shelly Friedman, a land use lawyer who represents both Shearith Israel and Kehilath Jeshurun.

    Alan D. Sugarman, an attorney who lives across the street from Shearith Israel is preparing to file an appeal to the Supreme Court on behalf of property owners on West 70th Street. He has until Sept. 29 to do so.

    In addition to turning the street into a “canyon of darkness” and “eroding the character of the neighborhood,” Shearith Israel’s new community house was pushed through the BSA using “phony financial analysis,” Sugarman charges. The financials were used to prove that the sale of the condos would not yield extra profits above and beyond the cost of constructing the community house. “You can put up three townhouses on the property and make an enormous amount of money,” he says. “It’s the most succulent piece of real estate in New York City.”

    Ron Prince, who lives on West 70th Street, says he will lose his terrace view of Central Park if the community house is built. “We view Shearith Israel as a very affluent and connected institution. The BSA caved into pressure. But the community will not let this stand without a fight.”

    While the preservationist groups complain that the tower’s height will destroy the character of the area, Shearith Israel lawyer Friedman says that it rises no taller than the building next door on West 70th Street. And as for setting a precedent, Friedman contends that the precedent has already been set. “Just look down the street, where the Rose building has been built above Lincoln Center,” he says.

    Shearith Israel has owned these air rights for half a century, Friedman adds. In this tough economy, he says, “the opportunity to raise money through philanthropic efforts is extremely limited.”

    The irony, Alan Sugarman points out, is that in 1896, when the trustees of Shearith Israel were first building the synagogue, they were concerned about upholding an individual opinion quoted in Gemara Shabbos that the roofs in a city not be taller than the synagogue. To the south of the synagogue, they constructed a four-story parsonage that was lower than the synagogue. And when the trustees sold land to the west of the synagogue, they placed restrictions on the height of any home built on the property.

    “Certainly in urban areas, this rule could not be followed,” Sugarman says. “But here the congregation is violating these principles by constructing a building next to its own sanctuary.”

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    5 COMMENTS

    1. Preservationist – one who wants to preserve his/her will over the needs and wants of all others.

      Its total chutzpa + preservation and Landmarking steal from the owner the ability to maximize their property potential for the benefit of someone elses aesthetic AT THE OWNERS EXPENSE for maintenance and repair of old deteriorating construction.

    2. The irony, Alan Sugarman points out, is that in 1896, when the trustees of Shearith Israel were first building the synagogue, they were concerned about upholding an individual opinion quoted in Gemara Shabbos that the roofs in a city not be taller than the synagogue. To the south of the synagogue, they constructed a four-story parsonage that was lower than the synagogue. And when the trustees sold land to the west of the synagogue, they placed restrictions on the height of any home built on the property.

      “Certainly in urban areas, this rule could not be followed,” Sugarman says. “But here the congregation is violating these principles by constructing a building next to its own sanctuary.”

      I hope that Mr. Sugarman is as makpid in daled chelkei shulchan aruch, as he is in this gemarah.

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